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neuroscience, all the underpinnings of these skills are formed in the environments in which children, babies grow up. i spent a lot of time with a pediatrician in san francisco who is watching how to improve environments for kids but a lot of folks also take place in schools dealing with adolescence when those qualities become character. in different ways, different educator's from a chess teacher in brooklyn to a private school principal in new york city to mentors working in the highest poverty neighborhood in chicago, trying to give students the sort of support and help they need to do better in this realm. mostly we don't quite know how to teach these francs, how to help kids improve. what i write about in this book is an experiment, new innovative ideas that might be able to help kids do better in this dimension and in the process help them do better in high school and college and life. >> i am going to follow up beach author's introduction with one quick question and get to the next topic. you wrote a book a few years ago while you were reporting for the new york times on the harlem ch
subsidizing a technology that destroys the environment in the name of saving the environment. for example, for the same -- it would take a row of 50 wind turbines from the appalachian trail to maine, that's 178 miles, to produce the same amount of electricity that four nuclear reactors would produce. the best way, mr. president, to produce cheap, clean energy in the united states is to let the marketplace do it, let the marketplace do it, not to subsidize jobs for technology that can stand on its own and produces only a small amount of unreliable electricity. so, mr. president, let's use this week to celebrate but let's celebrate the end of the temporary 21-year-old wind production tax credit and use the $12.1 billion saved to reduce the federal debt. thank you, mr. president. i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from louisiana. ms. landrieu: thank you, mr. president. i have come to the floor to speak just briefly about a very exciting opportunity and occurrence that we celebrate and honor every november, and that is the opportunity to adopt chil
that may be hoarding cash to protect themselves in this uncertain environment but does that mean, likely, they're going to spend that cash or put it to work once we get a resolution of the fiscal cliff? >> it all depends on how it gets resolved. if obama gets his way, and we get big tax increases on small businesses, but also increased double taxation of dividends and capital gains, we'll have a less friendly economic environment for investment to car inside the united states. and that would mean an incentive for companies not to conduct business here. maybe to expand their branchs and their operations overseas. yes, there's the short-term uncertainty in the fiscal cliff that's hurting, but then i actually agree with michael. it's long-term fundamentals that matter. our government is just too much of a burden. >> steve, what's at stake here? >> i want to talk about two scientists from two different fields. one is pav lolov. a dog would salivate when you put food in hem. ed prescott took that idea and said, you know what, when companies spend, they spend after and during recessions when t
technologies allow natural gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. till you finish your vegetables. [ clock ticking ] [ male announcer ] there's a better way... v8 v-fusion. vegetable nutrition they need, fruit taste they love. could've had a v8. or...try kids boxes! could've had a v8. music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health
air strikes. and it has been a problem since this administration helped create the environment in north africa. and in the middle east, with those who want to see israel destroyed could take power. more violence has occurred. not less. more people's lives are in danger, not less. there's less freedom of worship, not more. the things that we believe in, freedom of worship of all people, or no worship if people choose not to worship, those kind of things should be kept. and yet, we are seeing this administration took over afghanistan, more americans die and about half the time under commander-in-chief obama has died in seven years than president bush. american military. over 70% of those killed in afghanistan have been under commander obama and about half the time. we have seen violence escalating against americans in afghanistan. we have seen the last christian church, public christian church pull out of afghanistan. this administration should be encouraging freedom of worship, encouraging the liberation of women, of children. and yet, for all its help, it has created environmen
charged three more people over the deep water horizon accident. this from environment and energy news. the justice department charged three workers involved in the deepwater horizon with various criminal violations. dd go down to amarillo, texas, merlin is waiting on the independent line. you're on the "washington journal." caller: i was just wondering how much b.p. has actually made cleaning up the spill? host: not a stat i have for you right now, merlin. i can tell you b.p. was reporting profits in the fourth quarter of 2010 after the spill occurred. profits of about $5.5 billion. the spill occurred in the summer of that year. this according to b.p.'s website. in the third quarter of 2010, b.p.'s profits were about $5 billion. in the fourth quarter of 2011, $7.6 billion in profits. caller: does anybody think that they might have did it on purpose? host: why would you think that, merlin? caller: well, because i heard that the night right before the spill they pulled out their stocks in a lot of, you know, some of the money that they had out there, they pulled out -- host: where are y
. >> translator: in the new environment, our party faces many tough challenges. there are numerous pressing problems within the party and senior ranks that need to be resolved, especially corruption and the acceptance of bribes. >> reporter: xi jinping is taking over the position of general secretary from hu jintao. he will lead the politburo's standing committee, china's main decision-making body. the number of seats on the committee has been reduced to seven from nine. analysts say the party made the change to speed up the decision-making process. xi jinping and another top official, li keqiang, have been on the standing committee since 2007. the rest of the members are new. xi introduced them all during his speech. >> zhang dejiang. yu zhengsheng. liu yunshan. wang qishan. zhang gaoli. >> reporter: the majority of officials on the standing committee are allies of former president who retired from politics nearly a decade ago. they face a number of challenges. one is wrapping up china's slowing economic engine. another is addressing growing social discontent over the widening wealth gap a
style of football. tough environment. their fans go crazy for the team. oregon is a great team, their defense played well. we found a way to survive or mistakes in the end and pull it out. >> heather: how much was experience a factor? this is the third time you have gone into overtime this season. >> yeah, we knew what we had to do. we won overtime, lost the other close one. but we just knew get the ball in overtime our defense will make plays and offense, try and get a touchdown always but we trust jordan in the end. >> heather: what was the key for you keeping i don't remember composure when your backs were against the wall? zpr try not to force anything. make a stupid mistake, take what is given to me by the defense and trust in my players around me >> heather: congrats on the big win, kevin. >> brent: some final thoughts? >> kirk: looks like he took good notes from andrew luck last year, what great composure. class act. you talk about notre dame controlling their destiny to get to the championship. the s.e.c. region, alabama and georgia, the winner of that game now also in
. >> these guys are important. unlike human beings, as we change the environment is bad for the environment, beavers form wetlands other species could move into. he's important. >> what else does he eat besides bananas? >> in the wild he would be eating all sorts of vegetation and they like to eat tree bark. he has teeth on them that are so much enamel that are bright orange. these guys chop down trees and build dams with them. >> you don't want to get in front of an angry beaver. >> bring out the owl. >> let me put the baby alligator away. the last animal is another species that would have been -- >> what are they called? >> barn owl. these are a species native to europe. european colonists would have been used to seeing these guys. they're not particularly common. these animals can find prey in pitch darkness. >> you're kidding. >> tests have been done on these species, they've removed every iota of light. just by their hearing they can find rodents which is their main prey. they are called barn owls, because they are one of the few species that can live in human structures and benefit fr
population control, the environment and they don't have anything in common with us. they get a peak of did a couple people they have out front to be their conservative individuals but if you really start peeling back the leaders of the onion and will make you cry. it's not conservative at all. they've got us fighting on this issue so much that the national conservative authors are claiming that it's one of the conservative principles. we need to use our conservative principles to address our problem and i think that is what has happened to the recent and it's not just about trying to win the election but grow the party and welcome people and we are wanting you to feel like you are at home. many to learn that in their rhetoric that has been displayed and is doing more damage than it is good. >> i should preface my remarks on this by saying i am in complete agreement that conservatives and republicans need to do a better job or some cases a job for the first time to appeal to hispanic voters and other nonwhite voters but we shouldn't kid ourselves about some of the obstacles we need to start
at a normal interest rate, i'm a guy that wants to go 50/50 bond equities, are you saying in this environment i should be 75 equities, 25 bonds because of the risk? >> yeah, i think the problem is nobody is 50/50. today people are sitting at 80% this bonds. 10% quit tis and a little bit of cash. here's the big issue. americans need to retire. 75% of them have already said they don't have enough money. 40% said they'll never have enough money. so they're funding their lon term liability which is retirement 15 years, on average 58 years old, and they're funding it with a security that's at the end of its peak cycle. so usual getting zero rate of return and you're saying i'll fund the liability by an investment that i'm guaranteed to lose money in. the world is more complicated. it's not 50 stock and 50 bond. so you have to say i need to start to move into a more balanced portfolio. the big problem people have is they think it's a binary switch. i go from stocks to bonds. maybe risky people and speculate tors do that. but it means i need to start to lessen my bond position, because more balanced
're talking with mike magner, the "national journal" energy and environment managing editor. he's also got this terrific book called poisoned legacy, great read about bp's rise to power. bp both on how they handled the gulf coast spill but also some other things in their record. mike, how bad are things in the coast right now? >> oh, boy, there is a long way to go on the cleanup. bp spilled an estimated five million barrels of oil into the gulf and in addition to a lot of natural gas that leaked and then when they were trying to clean it up, they used all of these dispersants, these chemicals that have really never been used on that scale. they cleaned up a lot of it by burning some of it off the surface and scrubbing what landed on the beaches but i talked yesterday to people in louisiana who say that there's still at least a million barrels out there. some of it is in wetlands in louisiana that's really difficult to clean up. and some of it -- because of the dispersants is still floating around out there. in particles and at
of $15 a barrel oil by 2025. in terms of prices, we're talking about in the environment similar to today's, maybe slightly worse, in order to hit those and provide incentive to hit those will targets and also to dampen demand. that is part of the iaea calculus. you have both the production and demand side. an order for us to even in part a modest amount and get to that point requires a major steps forward in fuel efficiency. host: so who is benefiting the most? guest: the middle east continues to benefit tremendously. opec countries share a global connection forecast to go up -- production forecast to go up to nearly half of world oil supplies. the middle east remains a big beneficiary. the u.s. will be better off in those terms than it would be without this increase will bring production. we will be keeping more money at home. oil makes up about two-thirds of our trade deficit now. that number will decline. oil companies that do very well with higher prices will continue to do very well. host: back to the idea of shale gas. you mentioned some parts of the country where this is happening
're not directly getting at that. >> i think the carbon tax makes enormous sense to do with the environment impact of energy use. you can design one in a way that does not cause too much harm for american industries that compete with folks abroad. consumption tax, there are things you can do to treat the income tax to make it look more like a consumption tax. >> i want each of you to give me your thoughts at the end of the day, what do you think the tax code will look like with his conversations between the cop -- between the president speaker boehner are done? >> i think we will have slightly higher marginal tax rates on some high-income tax -- and these 1 high income tax payer. i think there will be a variety of tax exclusions and deductions that are scaled back modestly. >> if scaled-back means capped in some way, i agree completely. rex i think we will see some of those things will back. the top rate will be either 39.6 or 35. it will be somewhere in between. >> we have some common ground here among our economists. thank you, a gentleman for joining us. thank you all. i appreciate the peterson
tax environment is the reality in the future is just a matter of what is the order of magnitude, is it rates versus limiting deductions and things like that. whatever you call it, higher deductions are coming. taxes on dividends, capital gains and a look at where the s&p was trading, up 15% or so. people will start to vacate the equity markets and take profits this year while the taxes are lower. it has caused some technical damage. the negative move in equity has driven bonds higher in price. we are kind of responsive to them, in that regard, but we are also responsive to the fact that businesses are finding it very hard to mike forward plans. connell: you also procure up into the mix, the dynamic that is been there for a long time with so we are the best of the worst where the money comes to the united states because other parts of the world is struggling >> absolutely. the aid package did not get passed through. it was supposed to go through the end of the month. they have to issue some bills today. we still have until the end of the month with greece. connell: this so-called
the environment. secondly, you talk at one point about the european parliament being an important partner for you and all the crisis related issues. white and has the fiscal pack gotten to the point that it has? when it's already clear that has two points that are conflicting with e.u. law in material and in formal terms, and that hasn't been regulated the european level. and implementation of the pact by the commission, well, how can we go along with that if the parliament is going to be excluded from that? you will have to deal with that on the first of the first. that is to come into force, but it will be impossible to implement it so how are you going to reconcile that contradiction? thank you. [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: chancellor, let me thank you very much for coming in today. i think it's been an interesting discussion. with certain heard a lot of political rhetoric. wavered not much economic reality from some members but that we are. we're used to it in this chamber. the october revolution was something to be celebrated, but chance of, i wish you well in a meeting with my
programs and environments where military and civilian leaders get a chance to share information. one thing we intentionally do is 101. our military fellows actually explain the military to the nonmilitary fellows. our doctors do a healthcare 101. so they become the experts in their field and share with each other. which is really incredible. but the military civilian piece is something a lot of these leaders do not get exposed to. both the military leaders as well as the civilian so for a couple of days every year, we often go on an aircraft carrier and really understand what happens on an aircraft carrier. it is really an incredible environment of learning. >> bill: right. so now as i understand, unlike candace, do you have a job to go back to. >> i will continue my training. and i'm looking forward to finishing it. at the end of those two years really is -- at the end of my training, i make a decision on how to enter the practice of medicine and really, if i will have an opportunity to have a large component de
sovereign nation. and the money doesn't go to clean it up. i know mr. waxman loves the environment, so do i. but this money doesn't go for that purpose. it can be used for anything. it's not for engine technology, it's not for restoration of the environment. and it doesn't stop emissions. so this bill does represent a bipartisan, bicameral compromise. but it gives us the authority to hold their feet to the fire and get a solution. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from west virginia. mr. lahood: mr. speaker, the gentleman i am going to yield to now may be departing the congress after this session. but we will still value his professionalism, his expertise and certainly his friendship for the very near and distant future. i'm happy to yield five minutes to the gentleman from illinois, the once chairman and now ranking member of our aviation subcommittee on transportation. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. >> i thank the gentleman, the running backing member, for yieldin
investment and the people, to follow our country in the competitive environment, and taxes is one of them. when you do that, you will get more revenue. it's guaranteed. again, it is sort of that thing we were talking about earlier. this is an opportunity for us as a country. and if you look at the congressional budget office analysis, what tax reform could mean in terms of macroeconomic impact of growth, i mean, all of them will lead to more growth, whether it is corporate tax reform or individual tax reform. >> he said this was fought over in the campaign and we fought over tax rates. rising tax rates. jay carney, the white house press secretary did say that the president will veto any bill that extends the current tax rates. so he insists that tax rates go up those making over $250,000. what would your recommendation be to the republican party in the senate? >> first, i believe the resident does have a detailed view of the press secretary. i like the president's comments better than jay carney's comments. i think jay carney was maybe, i think he was a little behind the curtain. i hope.
operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. >>> another keeping them honest rosht, why was president obama kept in the dark about cia director david petraeus' affair with paula broadwell until after the election. attorney general eric holder knew in late summer of at fair. that information according to the white house was never passed until months later. consider this, the director of the c.i.a. was having an extramarital affair, communicating with his mistress via an unsecure e-mail account and potentially putting national security at risk. obama was asked about the investigation today during the news conference. >> i am withholding judgment. with respect to how the entire process surrounding general petraeus came up. we don't have all of the information yet. but i want to say that i have a lot of confidence generally in the fbi and they have a difficult job. and so i'm going to wait and see. >> the white house says there are protocols, that's the word they used, that must be followed when notifying the white house about the
in this hard-charging be the best environment, it was a take no prisoners attitude, right? >> it was. and we were two really different children. and now that i have two sons of my own and i have seen them come out i see that kids are born differently. they respond to the same type of parenting totally differently. for myself it drove me to perfection. it drove me to demand the most for myself. it drove me to study inhuman hours. i could keep going relept -- relentlessly like you do around here. i could charge harder. but for my sister, when she felt she couldn't perform and she couldn't make my mother happy, and she couldn't achieve the same things she saw me doing it destroyed her. it took a big bite out of her confidence and out of hershey thought she was. -- out of who she thought she was. >> where was your dad in all of this? >> my dad and i are very close and we talk and e-mail every day. he was a small business owner. he was someone who worked all the time. we had a very traditional family where he would go out and earn, and my mother would stay home and take care of us. i talk to my s
changing rapidly as a factor in the environment is to knowledge across the board, primarily information technology in various manifestations and that seems like a drastic reshaping, but also can have effects on where the apparent power resources, traditional kinds of nontraditional kinds. although we often highlight the potential for empowered individuals can go around and cause havoc using new technologies and new dangers and threats, there's a new bond film out. every bond film has featured some transnational nonstate actor going on with the technology causing havoc. i'm not sure how terribly new threat that is. new technologies seem to reinforce the power of existing orders. if you think of the degree to which the national ecological revolution has reenergized the north american energy markets is fundamentally reset politics towards the traditional powers in the west rather than away from them come when you think about drones in the war on terror and the degree to which technology has allowed a tight footprint that is far more effective in many respects than the specific task of gett
and assurances to make sure your operating in a safe and secure environment are in place. those other things you are not doing begin to recognize, you start doing. that again, those of the weakness as reported at those 24 agencies other than the intelligence community. now, if you look at, and this is again the gao data, these are computer incidents reported from 2006 through 2011. you can see there has been a 700% increase in that from 5000 incidents up to 45,000 incidents per year. that is just those that have been reported and detected. many incidents go on that are not detected. when we are talking about cyber security and cyber warfare and cyber attacks we have incidents that pops up from time to time and hit the news. we all read about them, but in the event there is a true systemic cyber attack it would go after all of our systems, all of our vulnerability iies. much of we see here is probing -- in the old civil war days when they sent a scout out to detect where the enemy was. that is happening in the cyberworld. many of these are just probes to sea, are these militias intrusions been de
and may have been a handful, but when you're in the right environment, great things can happen. i'm very fortunate that i was with a family i was with. they showed me a lot of direction and structure. they also introduced me to sports. my dad took a lot of time teaching me how to throw football and being athletic. he played tennis, golf, you know. it gives you a chance to do something great and gives also the kid that you adopt a chance to fulfill the potential. >> and tomorrow, more than 20 adoptions will be finalized at the special ceremony. why is it a big deal, a big day for the families? >> what makes it great, these kids, they get to watch a child start their journey, you know, they end one chapter and begin with something greater and that is exciting to me to see the kids go into the wonderful families and then watch their highways blossom to who they can be. >> all right. >> and let me ask you, so you won the bronze medal in the 2012 summer olympics. >> yeah. >> what are your plans moving forward? >> i'm working on the guest -- to be a school teacher in the state of georgia. >> u
, while the market to just digest and trade under normal environment. we may not see a lot of volatility, that is not such a horrible thing in the market not selling off 20 handles anytime anybody opens their mouth. what we don't need is more talk. just the way it is. liz: mark sebastian did not even drink red bull today, the traders are so anxious and tired of seeing their ability to trade on real fundamentals, isn't that correct? the news they have made the market look so much higher. >> there's a lot of positive news. housing market, it was not that bad. i think fundamentally if we get a deal done i agree, we are going right to 1500. i was actually surprised the big fiscal cliff caught us by surprise so bad. liz: we want to bring in the very people talking about that, sunamerica funds vp and mariner wealth advisor cio. you do have a feeling of cautiousness about you, did you believe the s&p could very well hit. 1530? >> yes. he has his bullhorns on today. what happened to our romney bump? you said it was debatable to president obama coming out today $1.6 trillion digestion of the tax
situations but also to look at the bigger public policy, that of the environment and that of climate change and global warming. we need to be cognizant of our stewardship over the -- our planet. we need to make certain that if these data that are compiled are telling us that there is increased prescription, for instance, over the catskills watershed, in my district, let's respond accordingly to sound public policy as it relates to our environment and our stewardship of the environment and let's be cognizant of the needs in response of this measure. you know, i'll just say this, and i know you want to add to this discussion here. i'll say this, in a time where government perhaps has been hit hard by critics out there suggesting there's no role for public sector here, we need to reduce government, i can tell you people addressing the war room, as they designated it, putting together all of the professionalism and academics and people who operate these programs and how well trained, watching that compilation, that collaborative effort of these profession alcs who are responding to public -- pr
environment, and we should not let the republicans say, we can just hide this. i do not want to hear how you hide your views. i want to hear how you change your views. >> when you see the message on how to integrate these ideas that they are part of the issues that affect your lives? >> when we were targeting battleground states, these women were reacting to what voters were reacting to. when we are talking about getting more and women into the pipeline, i want to go back to the big story of this campaign and recruiting and getting more women involved and waking up that independent voter, who is becoming more conscious of these issues but also thinking about running and which party they might align with the reagan -- they might align with. one thing we talked about is the amount of money spent on these campaigns that paralyzes the candidates, because they look at it like, how can i even take that on? part of their job is to be able to help candidates raise that kind of money, communique to independent female voters that will elect them and also be able to teach the tactics of how do we commu
, one that improves the environment, saves money in the long run. congress can begin on this now. in the aftermath of hurricane sandy, congress can't ignore the near bankrupt flood insurance program. while we fix the short-term problems, however, let's make it more effective, efficient and actuarially sound so that it will spare lives, property and the federal treasury. overhauling the flood insurance program would solve the most immediate challenges caused by extreme weather events likely due to global warming. we may even be able to discuss climate change in a more thoughtful and rational way. based on work i've done in the past with congressman ryan and jeff flake, i know agriculture reform is a ripe opportunity. taxpayers cannot afford to lavish unnecessary subsidies on large agri business while harming the environment and shortchanging small farmers and ranchers. surely, tea party republicans and members of the progressive caucus can come together to improve nutrition, wildlife habitat, hunting and fishing while strengthening family farms. and since big bird dodged a bullet
ones. i am searching for the companies that i like that can thrive in this environment with the fiscal cliff and with a recession a possibility. look, it's a possibility if they don't solve this thing. today i was throwing a surprise party for amgen. you know what, fiscal cliff, no fiscal cliff, we're still having an amgen party here. inappropriate balloon moment there. they make all kinds of drugs for many serious illnesses. it has seven products in development that are starting phase three clinical trials in the early part of next year. phase three means it's getting near fruition. amgen could double earnings per share over the next eight years. that is much better than a sharp stick in the retina. amgen reported on october 23rd after the close and the company delivered spectacular results and was a true triple play. earnings came in $1.67, and revenues 5.9% year over year. when the street was looking for $4.25 billion. management's four-year guidance, substantially higher than the analysts expecting. those were fabulous numbers. no surprise that the stock shot up from $87.32, to nea
. they can out maneuver us in a number of ways in the corporate environment, and make their companies much more competitive against the united states. >> host: so to the fbi, what is the fbi's role, doesn't have the resources and if somebody who former fbi, what would you say about its success so far? >> guest: so i think the fbi, particularly in the last five years or so has made significant strides. let me say first that this really is the response in this area needs to be the government as well as the private sector. when you're talking of the government, it's the whole of government. it's the intelligence community, department of defense, fbi, dhs et cetera. there's a whole host of government agencies. the fbi's role, the fbi as you know wears two hats. they have a criminal responsibility as well as a national security responsibility. and the fbi's role is really looking domestically to gather intelligence and mitigate the threat. and the fbi does that in a variety of ways, clicking intelligence, sharing it with others and government sharing it with the private sector. the primary goal
was not consistent with its policies and it remains committed to maintaining a safe environment. >>> other bay area headlines, in oakland, an employee of super link plastics was killed about 9:45 this morning. a spokesman for the recycling plant says it was an accident involving a forklift. oakland police and state safety officials are investigating. >>> our camera was there as antioch police arrested a man on suspicion of murder in connection with last night's shooting death of a 32-year-old man at an apartment complex on sycamore drive. police are work on a motive. >>> a bar fire is one of three suspicious fires in vallejo over night. le the village cocktail lounge call fire not long after a house fire two blocks away. this morning, someone set fire to a nearby veterinarian's office. nobody was hurt in any of the fires. >>> a daly city neighborhood already inundated with mud because of a water main break is now bracing for rain. roberta gonzales with how crews are trying to prevent an even bigger mess. >> reporter: in order to explain all of this that's occurring here tonight in this daly city ne
do not want to think about them as an increase. just stop the cut in an environment where it is absolutely essential. i had no children. maybe i will not feel it did not much. but like the last caller said i am ready to pay my their share. and the thing is that fairness is not guaranteed. but this is where i put my emphasis, what is democracy? we have got to try to work and create fairness. a graduated income tax is the best way to pay according to the ability to pay. the more you give, the more you pay. what is complicated? guest: the caller brings up a great point. this idea of tax fairness. who should pay more? another caller brought up before. what this caller is scion is that something that the president echoed again and again on the campaign trail. and he feels like this as part of the government moving forward. part of the tax fairness issue is at the wealthy should pay more to help pay down the deficit. the other caller was saying he feels like more people should pay federal income taxes to pay down the federal it deficit. this is sort of the two ways that the part
in a sense the job of government is to provide an environment in which citizens can at their lives, knowing that they will not be subject to nefarious actions by others. in the case of the farmers and ranchers, the terrible stories, thousands of stories like this to chairman bachus describes. there was a failure at government to protect these people and the results of this investigation, fulfilling compasses obligation to provide oversight of us we had many opportunities to improve and provide better protection in these opportunities run the gamut from following behavior of those who are in charge entities like mf global, to monitoring and modifying the ways in which the ratings agencies do their business, to their job. and there have been so many failures in so many ways, not only in mf global, but in other, similar stories in recent history. one common strand seems to be that we need to provide our regulators with better tools to pursue the enforcement of laws that existed prior to the massive imposition of dog crank. we do not have infinite resources and our financial marketplace. we do
soft shoot out. family-friendly environment for family and friends to come out and play. the general dynamics corpation has had this out for decade came out with a civilian range program. we jumped on it. it is invalable for the people with concealable and fire arms to help defend themselves and their familis and put it in an outstanding training tool. you say it is great for self defense and better than shooting on the dummy on the paper when you are doing target amy. what is the difference here. you are shooting people with rubber bullets, right. >> it is not a rubble bullet it is a man-marking cart rage. like a paint ball. but it leaves a slight mark and you can check your hits. the guns are retrofitted and not something we created in a back yard. it is it a proven system from general dynamics and the weapons are rendered safe and only foir a man marking cart rage and they engage each other in real-life scenario. >> gretchen: people understand it is it training military people who are in war and killing each other or police officers potentially. what is the benefit to the average
to day livelihood in plays like west virginia, louisiana. while their environment is being destroyed, if you think about louisiana as a state that is being literally destroyed by the industry that employs a good number of the people there. so every mechanism in that state is designed to protect an industry that's destroying the state. but people as real lives are tied to it. even democrats, someone like jay rockefeller who is considered a great prerogative when it comes to coal, he's are with the republicans. >> anyone who is going to be elected -- there are certain places where it's the geographic interests override the ideological ones. >> that's why is we need some actually leadership from the president, and others on the really central issues. i mean, look, climate change is the legacy issue of all legacy issues. you know, 100 years from now, the only thing that people are going to look back on 2012 and care about. the fiscal cliff or the -- it's like, you guys the arctic melts and you didn't do anything about it? why is that? >> keystone is one pipeline. the canadian company is
, as does my environment just by nature. so the book is very much about our landscape, how we perceive it as fascinating in our youth and how over time it changes. the same substance -- stone, rock, water, wood -- go from being the unknown, worthy of curiosity, to at some point being a threat. and the natural defiance of us living our lives, which is in defiance of our mortality all the way from childhood where we're immortal to our elder years where we become the thing that holds so many people we've lost and is what survives. memory is what survives. and within that memory the afterlife of so much. so thank you. [applause] >> good afternoon. i'd also like to thank the organizers of the miami book fair for having me. when i started writing my book a year or two ago, i certainly did not expect i would end up here or seated on a panel with these gentlemen. i think what we've heard so far is that a lot of war stories represent a need to explain. why was there an outpost where there should never have been an outpost? what's the context within my own war experience? who was i before i went
-- there might be a t.a.r.p. like environment where we do go over the cliff, the cliff, whatever that means, exactly, but we don't hit the first set of deadlines. something doesn't pass the first time, but then eventually some of the members of both sides are brought to heal by the prospect of -- >> the real -- not just the pending doom but doom actually present in their laps for a second. that seems like a possible scenario to me. i do think there still is, despite all sharp rhetoric, i still think on the republican side, which is so critical, this notion of the other thing you heard throughout all of the commentary for the last week and over the weekend is that the implications of the election still are -- is sinking in. republicans still -- you see with this continued criticism of romney's comments and so on. that's still setting? >> all right. you mentioned benghazi. let's go to the developments there in the on going controversy over the administration's response to the attack on the u.s. consulate in bengha benghazi. members of congress are now vowing to find out why the cia's conclusi
around the senate and house, and i can sense that there is a great environment to actually do something. the question is, it is it going to be comprehensive? i doubt it. today what we know as comprehensive reform in 2006 and 2007 is not necessarily what the administration is talking about. the president talking about comprehensive reform. but i wonder if that comprehensive reform includes a guest worker program. at the end, that is the key to resolving this issue. the unions, which the president is loyal to, don't want to see a guest worker program, because they don't want to see more foreign workers enter the country. they want to ensure that labor markets, the labor supply, remain small. the guest worker program is key, because to grow our economy, we need to add to growth industries that need the foreign work force. the last reform we have under the reagan years lacked a workable guest worker program. that was amnesty could be gave amnesty to 3 million individuals. but at the time, the market had already absorbed those 3 million individuals. what happened? immigrants kept coming in t
. that is a real scoop in an environment where there are no deals, david brought us a very good scoop. >> that's why you haven't participated in any of this. there are no other deals. this was the only one. >> not many needles in the hay stack. >> david found the only one. thank you for bringing it here, david. boyd jeffries name. >> what was it exposure in europe? >> egan had all sorts of rhymes and reasons for that company falling apart. >> we'll talk about shipping right now, from i-phones to apparel, cnbc's senior talent producer, lori ann larocco, our staff, incredible producer and her book "dynasties of the sea," and lori ann, reading through this, we know how important shipping is, we talk about it every day but there were things i didn't realize how much of the things in our homes are brought to us from ships. >> 92% of everything in a household has been on a ship and ever since superstorm sandy we've all realized how important shipping is as we're all going through this gasoline crisis. it's really amazing in terms of the wide breadth that the shipping industry has on the economy. >>
countries that have more competitive environment and taxes are one of them. yes, we have to reform the tax code. when you do that, i will get more revenue. it is guaranteed. again, sort of as i was talking about earlier. this is opportunities here. this is opportunity for us as a country. if you look at the congressional budget analysis and joint tax committee analysis, what tax reform could mean in terms of macroeconomic impact and growth, all will lead to more growth, whether corporate tax reform or individual tax reform. >> right but if the president insists as he did last friday, this was fought over in the campaign and, fought over tax rates, rising tax rates, he didn't ice the words rates himself but jay carney, the white house press secretary said the president will veto any bill that extends the current tax rates. if he insists that tax rates go up for those making over $250,000, what's, what would your recommendation be to the republican congress and senate? >> first having worked in two white houses i believe a president does have a veto over the press secretary. thank goodness b
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